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Boyce Digital Library

  • LEADING MEMBERS TO A CONVICTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE HISTORIC DOCTRINAL EMPHASES OF CHURCHES OF CHRIST AT THE CONCORD ROAD CHURCH OF CHRIST, BRENTWOOD, TENNESSEE
    LEADING MEMBERS TO A CONVICTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE HISTORIC DOCTRINAL EMPHASES OF CHURCHES OF CHRIST AT THE CONCORD ROAD CHURCH OF CHRIST, BRENTWOOD, TENNESSEE Chambers, Dan This project seeks to rebuild the doctrinal foundations of the Concord Road Church of Christ. Chapter one introduces the Concord Road Church and the theological identity crisis among Churches of Christ. Chapter two provides a biblical and theological rationale for promoting obedience to God in all aspects of church life as one of the highest goals for the individual Christian and the local church. It also seeks to biblically establish the validity of restoration as a theological principle. Chapter three amplifies the current theological identity crisis in Churches of Christ with a discussion of specifics. It also connects the crisis to the larger contemporary American church culture which seems to downplay doctrine more so than previous generations. Chapter four explains the process used to implement the project. Chapter five analyzes and evaluates the results of the project.
  • Training Students in the Beliefs and Ministries of Jubilee Baptist Church, Daphne, Alabama
    Training Students in the Beliefs and Ministries of Jubilee Baptist Church, Daphne, Alabama Stringer, Jr., Leon P. The purpose of this project was to train students in the beliefs and ministries of Jubilee Baptist Church in Daphne, Alabama. Chapter 1 presents the purpose and goals of the project along with its ministry context, rationale, and methodology. Chapter 2 provides a biblical and theological argument for the necessity of church membership for every believer. Chapter 3 considers the implications of such a doctrine for teenagers and the practical and theoretical issues for teaching students and integrating them into church life. Chapter 4 recounts the methodology used in this project. Chapter 5 offers an analysis and evaluation of the project's effectiveness along with theological and personal reflections that resulted from the project.
  • Equipping Parents at Eunhye Korean Presbyterian Church, Indianapolis, Indiana, To be the Primary Disciple Makers of Their Children
    Equipping Parents at Eunhye Korean Presbyterian Church, Indianapolis, Indiana, To be the Primary Disciple Makers of Their Children Lee, Choonghyun EQUPPIING PARENTS AT EUNHYE KOREAN PRESBYTERAN CHURCH, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, TO BE THE PRIMARY DISCIPLE MAKERS OF TEHIR CHILDREN Choonghyun Lee, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Shane Parker This project deals with the issue of developing and implementing a Sunday School curriculum to equip the parents at Eunhye Korean Presbyterian Church (EKPC), Indianapolis, Indiana, to be the primary disciple makers of their children. Chapter 1 lays out the purpose, goals, ministry context, rationale, limitations and delimitations, and research methodology. Chapter 2 examines a biblical foundation for family discipleship. The chapter focuses on the exegesis and exposition of the related passages: Deuteronomy 6:4-9, Genesis 18:16-19, Psalm 78:1-8, Matthew 28:16-20, Ephesians 6:4 and Colossians 3:21, and 2 Timothy 1:3-10. All these passages addresses that God calls parents to be the primary disciple-makers of their children. Chapter 3 addresses a historical support for family discipleship and family ministry. Throughout Christian history, the parents’ role as the primary disciplers of their children has been emphasized and implemented in the church and the home. This chapter addresses how historical theologians and pastors have embraced and implemented parents’ spiritual role in their children’s lives. Chapter 4 outlines the implementation of the project by describing the process from start to finish. The chapter includes the explanation of questionnaires, the focal group, and a week-by-week process. Chapter 5 is an evaluation of the project and a statement of theological and personal reflections.
  • Developing and Implementing a Training in Biblical Interpretation for the Bible Study Teachers at First Baptist Church, Waynesboro, Georgia
    Developing and Implementing a Training in Biblical Interpretation for the Bible Study Teachers at First Baptist Church, Waynesboro, Georgia Godfrey, Michael Lewis The purpose of this project was to develop and implement training in biblical interpretation for the Bible study teachers at First Baptist Church, Waynesboro, Georgia. Chapter 1 presents the purpose, goals, ministry context, rationale, definitions, limitations, delimitations and research methodology for this project. Chapter 2 presents the biblical and theological foundations for training in biblical interpretation through the exegesis of Old Testament and New Testament passages. Chapter 3 presents the theoretical and practical foundations for training teachers in biblical interpretation through the consideration of biblical theology, hermeneutical principles, membership in the church, and the clarity of Scripture. Chapter 4 gives a detailed presentation of the way in which the project was carried out by laying out the six phases of this project. Chapter 5 examines and presents the results of the project, includes changes I would make, and theological and personal reflections from the execution of this project.
  • VOCATIONAL MINISTRY TRAINING AT LIBERTY UNIVERSITY IN LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA
    VOCATIONAL MINISTRY TRAINING AT LIBERTY UNIVERSITY IN LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA Geukgeuzian, Jonathan ABSTRACT VOCATIONAL MINISTRY TRAINING AT LIBERTY UNIVERSITY IN LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA Jonathan Allen Geukgeuzian, D.Ed.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Troy W. Temple This project designed a program standard for internships aimed at the ministry training program for the Department of Church Ministries at Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia, by identifying qualities a student should learn in his or her higher education and training for ministry. Chapter 1 presents the purpose, goals, ministry context, rationale, definitions, limitations, and research methodology of the project. Chapter 2 discusses the biblical and theological foundations of ministry training. This chapter identifies the model of ministry training in the Old Testament, the New Testament nature, and specifically through the lives of Jesus and the apostle Paul from a biblical-theological perspective. Chapter 3 discusses the theoretical and sociological support of experiential learning as it relates to ministry training. A discussion of the historical models of teaching-learning is included. Chapter 4 outlines the details of essential qualities needed in ministry training in this project. This chapter also includes results from the instruments used to measure the essential qualities for experiential learning in ministry training from students, recent graduates on a church staff, and church leaders with established internship programs for students. Chapter 5 provides an evaluation of the project goals, along with its strengths and weaknesses. This project contends a valid method for enhancing the ministry training program there must be a standard for internships that focuses on the essential qualities necessary for experiential learning in ministry training.
  • DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A CURRICULUM FOR TEACHING A BIBLICAL META-NARRATIVE TO THE ADULTS AT COLLEGE PARK CHURCH IN INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
    DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A CURRICULUM FOR TEACHING A BIBLICAL META-NARRATIVE TO THE ADULTS AT COLLEGE PARK CHURCH IN INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA Bartemus, Joseph R. ABSTRACT DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A CURRICULUM FOR TEACHING A BIBLICAL META-NARRATIVE TO THE ADULTS AT COLLEGE PARK CHURCH IN INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA Joseph Robert Bartemus, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. James M. Hamilton Chapter 1 of this project describes the planning and objectives of the project. The development of a curriculum that covers relevant material on the meta-narrative of the Bible was revised and developed. The curriculum involved a video series with two pastors discussing the concept and details of the biblical meta-narrative. Booklets were also developed to complement the spoken material. Facilitators or teachers were trained to utilize the tools to bring about the actual implementation of the project in teaching smaller groups of adults the essence of the overarching biblical meta-narrative of the Bible. Chapter 2 discusses passages from the Old and New Testament which were analyzed to provide biblical validation concerning the need for such a project. Chapter 3 includes an overview of basic educational literature which was summarized in regard to adult learning and curriculum. Chapter 4 describes the steps of the project in detail to show how the implementation occurred. In chapter 5 the project was evaluated and found to be successful based on several factors, including a statistical affirmation. This chapter includes concluding evaluations of the project in terms of accomplishing goals, strengths and weaknesses, and future plans.
  • Mentoring believers at Locust Hill Baptist church in Travelers Rest, South Carolina
    Mentoring believers at Locust Hill Baptist church in Travelers Rest, South Carolina Burchfield, Christopher Alan ABSTRACT MENTORING BELIEVERS AT LOCUST HILL BAPTIST CHURCH IN TRAVELERS REST, SOUTH CAROLINA Christopher Alan Burchfield, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Bruce A. Ware This project sought to equip believers at Locust Hill Baptist Church in Travelers Rest, South Carolina, in spiritual disciplines and in some of the foundational doctrines of the Christian faith. Chapter 1 explains the reason for the project as well as the purpose and goals. Chapter 2 reveals the biblical and theological reasoning for mentoring as a form of discipleship. Chapter 3 analyzes several different contexts for mentoring and then discusses a number of methodologies that could be adopted into the local church from secular programs. Chapter 4 discusses the methodological approach of the project. It explains the order in which the project was executed. Chapter 5 provides an evaluation of the project, including goals, strengths, weaknesses, and what could have been done differently.
  • Equipping Families at Grace Crossing Church, Louisville, Kentucky, to Practice Daily Family Worship
    Equipping Families at Grace Crossing Church, Louisville, Kentucky, to Practice Daily Family Worship Lewis, Kyle Jonathan EQUIPPING FAMILIES AT GRACE CROSSING CHURCH, LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY, TO PRACTICE DAILY FAMILY WORSHIP Kyle Jonathan Lewis, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Donald S. Whitney This project sought to develop the spiritual discipline of family worship at Grace Crossing Church, Louisville, Kentucky. Chapter 1 introduces Grace Crossing Church, Louisville, Kentucky, and gives a broad overview of the project. There were three goals for this project: help the families grow in their understanding of family worship, motivate families to practice family worship on a daily basis, with a minimum of at least five times per week, and encourage families to read Scripture, pray, sing, and have a time of biblical education. Chapter 2 gives biblical and theological support for family worship. Chapter 3 evaluates the historical and practical issues related to family worship. Chapter 4 gives a detailed description of how the project was carried out. Finally, Chapter 5 evaluates both the project and the results of the project.
  • THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A LAY COUNSELING PROGRAM AT OAK PARK BAPTIST CHURCH, JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA
    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A LAY COUNSELING PROGRAM AT OAK PARK BAPTIST CHURCH, JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA Millican, Nathan This project involves evaluating an individual’s competency and confidence in using the Scriptures, developing a curriculum to help foster more confidence in using the Scriptures, and exposing the person to the authority and sufficiency of the Scriptures regarding several everyday occurrences that take place in the lives of people in the church. The Scriptures place upon every Christian the expectation to come alongside other Christians and help them mature in Jesus (Matt 28:18-20; Col 1:28). Thus, this project seeks to educate, equip, and instill confidence in an individual regarding the power and authority of God’s Word in actually helping bring about real and lasting change to people’s problems.
  • DEVELOPING AND TEACHING AN ADULT CURRICULUM ON THE BAPTIST FAITH AND MESSAGE, HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, TULLAHOMA, TENNESSEE
    DEVELOPING AND TEACHING AN ADULT CURRICULUM ON THE BAPTIST FAITH AND MESSAGE, HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, TULLAHOMA, TENNESSEE Keene, Stephen Matthew ABSTRACT DEVELOPING AND TEACHING AN ADULT CURRICULUM ON THE BAPTIST FAITH AND MESSAGE, HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, TULLAHOMA, TENNESSEE Stephen Matthew Keene, D.Ed.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Anthony W. Foster This project examines the need for the theological training of adults in Southern Baptist churches using the 2000 version of The Baptist Faith and Message. Chapter 1 explains the goals, ministry context, rationale, definitions, limitations and delimitations, and methodology of the project, thereby revealing the need for a series on Southern Baptist doctrine at Highland Baptist Church. Chapter 2 provides a scriptural and theological justification for believers to know and understand doctrine. Chapter 3 provides the practical implications for Christians to know and understand doctrine. Chapter 4 examines the project implementation where adults are led through a thirteen-week series on The Baptist Faith and Message. The project concludes in chapter 5 with an examination of conclusions, evidence of findings, and an evaluation of the overall project. Appendices provide charts, curriculum, pre/post-series surveys and the 2000 version of The Baptist Faith and Message.
  • Developing Disciple-Makers at Bay Area First Baptist Church in League City, Texas
    Developing Disciple-Makers at Bay Area First Baptist Church in League City, Texas Allen, Joshua Webb DEVELOPING DISCIPLE-MAKERS AT BAY AREA FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH IN LEAGUE CITY, TEXAS Joshua Webb Allen, D. Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Donald S. Whitney This project was designed to equip adults at Bay Area First Baptist Church in League City, Texas to become disciple-makers who mature spiritually and begin discipling. Chapter 1 explains the purpose, goals, context, and rationale of the project. Chapter 2 explores the biblical and theological basis for developing disciple-makers. An exegesis of Matthew 28:16-20, John 15:1-5, Deuteronomy 6:4-9, 2 Timothy 2:1-7, Matthew 4:19, Luke 9:1-2, and Acts 18:24-28 supports the purpose of the project. Chapter 3 explains theoretical and practical support for developing disciple-makers by focusing on three primary areas critical to the disciple: Scripture, prayer, and abiding in Christ. It also explores the development of an intentional discipleship process and small group leadership. Chapter 4 describes the project including curriculum development, approval, participant recruitment, curriculum teaching, and group replication. Chapter 5 evaluates the project for effectiveness and improvement. The project successfully developed disciple-makers at Bay Area First Baptist Church.
  • Implementing A Discipleship Mentoring Program at Calvary Baptist Church, Boise, Idaho
    Implementing A Discipleship Mentoring Program at Calvary Baptist Church, Boise, Idaho Bekkedahl, Mark Lane Abstract Chapter one describes the purpose, goals, and context of the project. Further, the basis for the projected is discussed, along with the project's definitions, limitations, and delimitations. Last, the research methodology for the Discipleship Mentoring Project is outlined. "Biblical and Theological Support for Discipling One Another" is the title of chapter two. The chapter includes a discussion of modern obstacles to disciplemaking, key New Testament words that define discipleship mentoring, a study of the transformational training of the disciples, key concepts for disciplemaking, and the rationale for discipleship and biblical counseling. Chapter three reviewed "Mentoring in the Twenty-first Century". Secular models from three different industries were reviewed; a number of Evangelical models of discipleship training were also examined. Practices from secular and Evangelical models were then compared to a biblical model of disciplemaking. The chapter concludes with a recap of useful ideas for a discipleship mentoring program. The Discipleship Mentoring project, as implemented from week one through fifteen, is the subject of chapter four. It includes an overview of the process, project description, schedule of study topics, and a description of the program participants. Also included is a description of the homework used, changes made to the original plan, the experience of mentoring others, and the process for evaluation. Results of the project are interpreted and discussed in chapter five. Sections include an analysis of an eighty-two statement pre-survey and post-survey, and an evaluation of project goals and methods, as well as theological and personal reflections, and insights gained. Eight appendices are also included. The first is a comparison of the pre-project and post-project surveys, the second appendix includes the participants closing comments about the project, and the third shows the Scripture memory verses used in the project and what week they were assigned. The fourth appendix consists of the complete outline of the Bible studies used in the project. The fifth appendix contains the suggested reading list for the project participants. Appendices six and seven contain examples of weekly handouts and weekly homework, respectively. Appendix eight includes an example of the commitment card participants signed at the beginning of the project.
  • The Meaning of Foreknowledge in Romans 8:29 and Its Ecclesiastical Implications
    The Meaning of Foreknowledge in Romans 8:29 and Its Ecclesiastical Implications Rader, Steven Kyle ABSTRACT THE MEANING OF FOREKNOWLEDGE IN ROMANS 8:29 AND ITS ECCLESIASTICAL IMPLICATIONS Steven Kyle Rader, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. William F. Cook, III This thesis examines the relationship between foreknowledge and election in Romans 8:29 and its implications for the church. Chapter 1 gives a brief historical sketch of the controversy over free will, outlining theology's three major historical peaks: Augustinianism and Pelagianism, Semi-Pelagianism, and Calvinism and Arminianism. Chapter 2 presents foreknowledge as foreseen faith. According to Arminianism, God's foreknowledge in Romans 8:29 refers to his foresight of those men and women who throughout time would come to believe in his Son, thus resulting in their election. Chapter 3 mirrors chapter two in structure and content but from the Calvinist perspective. Foreknowledge does not mean foresight of faith; instead, it refers to God's covenantal commitment to individuals he set his love upon before the creation of the world. Chapter 4 defends the Hebraic understanding of foreknew by giving five lines of argument for defining ðñïÝãíù as "foreloved." The five arguments are (1) Defining foreknowledge as foreseen faith requires that the concept of prevenient grace be true, which is an idea not substantiated from Scripture. (2) Foreseen faith is foreign to the text of Romans 8:29. (3) The verb ãéíþóêù, from which "foreknew" is derived, often connotes love, affection, and relationship. (4) The terms "foreknowledge" and "predestination" are not synonymous. (5) Since justification is by faith, and only those who are called are justified, it must be that God's calling produces faith. Chapter 5 contends that the Calvinistic view of foreknowledge makes a significant difference in the practical outworking of life and faith over and above the Arminian view. It addresses three areas of ecclesiastical life: personal assurance, evangelism, and pastoral ministry.
  • DEVELOPMENT OF A LAY LEADERSHIP TRAINING CONFERENCE FOR RURAL APPALACHIAN CHURCHES
    DEVELOPMENT OF A LAY LEADERSHIP TRAINING CONFERENCE FOR RURAL APPALACHIAN CHURCHES Wilson, Jimmy D. ABSTRACT DEVELOPMENT OF A LAY LEADERSHIP TRAINING CONFERENCE FOR RURAL APPALACHIAN CHURCHES Jimmy Derek Wilson, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. William D. Henard This project explores the need and development of lay leadership in rural churches. It seeks to design a process for a leadership training conference. Chapter 1 presents the purpose, goals, context, rationale, definitions, and limitations of the project. Chapter 2 discusses biblical and theological perspectives on leadership in the lives of Moses, Paul, Timothy, and Jesus. Specifically, this chapter focuses on the character of leaders, spiritual gifts, personalities, and biblical role of spiritual mentors. Chapter 3 surveys the roles of leadership in churches and presents a model of lay leadership development. This chapter explores a process that recognizes rural and local church culture to develop leaders that are key to overcoming obstacles to growth. Chapter 4 explains the creation and implementation of the conference in rural Appalachian churches. Attention is given to the five phases of the project and to the transformation of leaders into agents of change in revitalization. Chapter 5 provides an evaluation of the project goals and suggested modifications to strengthen the project for future use. This project asserts that to develop lay leaders, a church must have a process of recognition and training of lay leaders.
  • EQUIPPING ASSOCIATE MINISTERS FOR ORDINATION INTO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY AT THE TRINITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, PONTIAC, MICHIGAN
    EQUIPPING ASSOCIATE MINISTERS FOR ORDINATION INTO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY AT THE TRINITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, PONTIAC, MICHIGAN Tolbert, John DeVar ABSTRACT EQUIPPING ASSOCIATE MINISTERS FOR ORDINATION INTO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY AT THE TRINITY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, PONTIAC, MICHIGAN John DeVar Tolbert, D.Min. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Faculty Supervisor: Dr. T. Vaughn Walker This project was designed to train and develop associate ministers into prepared ordination candidates at the Trinity Missionary Baptist Church, Pontiac, Michigan. Chapter 1 states the purpose and goals of this project. Attention is also given to context, definitions and delimitations, and the project methodology. Chapter 2 observes the biblical and theological rationale for developing associate ministers into prepared ordination candidates. Chapter 3 focuses on evaluating and implementing practical concepts for ordination preparation. Perspectives of understanding pragmatic methods of leadership are examined in this chapter along with insight to the role of the pastor in the development process of training associate ministers for ordination. Chapter 4 gives attention to the project design. Specifically, an analysis of how the project was implemented is reviewed. Insight is given on the presentation of various training sessions. Chapter 5 analyzes the conclusion of the project. Results and expressions regarding conclusive results are given in this chapter.
  • C. S. Lewis's Concept of Sehnsucht: Philosophical Foundations, Aesthetic Analysis, and Implications for Evangelism and Apologetics
    C. S. Lewis's Concept of Sehnsucht: Philosophical Foundations, Aesthetic Analysis, and Implications for Evangelism and Apologetics Crawford, Matthew David ABSTRACT C. S. LEWIS’ CONCEPT OF SEHNSUCHT: PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS, AESTHETIC ANALYSIS, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR EVANGELISM AND APOLOGETICS Matthew David Crawford, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Chair: Dr. Mark T. Coppenger C. S. Lewis’ concept of Sehnsucht as inconsolable longing for beauty holds much promise for Christian aesthetics, evangelism, and apologetics. In his autobiography, Surprised by Joy, and many of his other works, Lewis shows how desire for beauty can draw individuals toward God. This dissertation fully develops Lewis’ concept of Sehnsucht within the framework of his life story as well as his writings. The dissertation then explores the corroboration of Lewis’ concept within both Christian and secular philosophical contexts. Once this foundation has been laid, the potential of Sehnsucht for opening hearts to the gospel of Christ and overcoming objections to faith in Him is outlined. Finally, the dissertation aesthetically analyzes specific films and pieces of music in search of common elements that may evoke Sehnsucht, as well as elements that may prevent it from being experienced.
  • PENAL SUBSTITUTIONARY ATONEMENT AS THE BASIS FOR NEW COVENANT AND NEW CREATION
    PENAL SUBSTITUTIONARY ATONEMENT AS THE BASIS FOR NEW COVENANT AND NEW CREATION Reid, Kenneth James This study will demonstrate that penal substitutionary atonement is necessary for the new creation. The new covenant promises are inaugurated at Jesus’ death and at Pentecost when the Spirit indwells Christians; the promises are consummated in the new heavens and the new earth. Jesus says that his death inaugurates the new covenant at the Last Supper (Luke 22:14-20). This study will argue that the new covenant promises of forgiveness, transformation by the Spirit, God’s abiding presence, and the believer’s knowledge of God require penal substitutionary atonement. Chapter 1 recounts the critique that penal substitution cannot account for transformation and the new creation. The chapter sets up the thesis and methodology of this study, and the rationale of a new covenant approach. Various critiques against penal substitution are also explored. Chapters 2 and 3 serve as foundational chapters in three respects. Chapter 2 presents a defense of penal substitutionary atonement by examining key passages in the Old and New Testaments. Chapter 3 explores the meaning of covenant and enumerates new covenant promises. In addition, the nature of the new covenant is explored by surveying relevant New Testament passages. Finally, the chapter shows that atonement inaugurates the new covenant. Chapters 4-7 each argue that penal substitution is required to fulfill the promises for personal renewal: the forgiveness of sins, the transformation of the heart by the Holy Spirit, God’s everlasting covenant presence, and an intimate knowledge of God by all covenant members. Each promise of the new covenant provides forgiveness of sins, enables empowerment over sin, or overcomes sin’s effects that form a barrier to a relationship with God. Chapter 8 argues that reconciliation requires penal substitutionary atonement, and reconciliation is the ultimate goal of the new covenant; God’ restores his relationship with his people so that he dwells with them in the new created order. Chapter 9 concludes with the affirmation that penal substitutionary atonement is necessary for the new created order, and it explores implications and areas of further study.
  • Foundations for a Biblical Model of Servant Leadership in the Slave Imagery of Luke-Acts
    Foundations for a Biblical Model of Servant Leadership in the Slave Imagery of Luke-Acts Cochrell, Timothy Robert This dissertation proposes that secular paradigms of servant leadership, rooted in the writings of Robert Greenleaf, are deficient theologically based on their humanistic presuppositions and deficient biblically based on their misunderstanding of the biblical language of service. This study proposes a model of slave leadership articulated in seven principles which are rooted in the slave language employed in Luke-Acts. First, the slave leader becomes God's own possession through redemption and therefore the leader belongs to God and is placed under the Lord's absolute authority. Second, the leader's identity is found exclusively in his relationship to the Master which entails great responsibility as the leader represents God in his service. Third, a slave leader exercises delegated authority from the Master, therefore his words and actions carry weight, not because of who he is, but because of whom he serves. The leader is both in authority and under authority, accountable to the master and responsible for the people he serves. Fourth, the slave leader focuses on pleasing the Master by subordinating his own will to that of the Master. The slave leader is expected to internalize the will of the Master so that he demonstrates the character and priorities of the Master in every leadership situation, even in the absence of explicit commands. Fifth, the leader as slave is compelled to give complete and unconditional obedience to God as Master. The leader may not pick and choose which of the master's commands to obey. The faithful slave carries out the will of the master, calling Him Lord and living it out. Sixth, just as a slave was entirely dependent upon the master for provision and direction, so a slave leader is constantly dependent upon the Lord and His indwelling presence for empowerment and discernment. Finally, the slave may be susceptible to abuse or mistreatment as a result of his unconditional obedience to the Master's will.
  • The Trinitarian Theology of John Gill (1697-1771): Context, Sources, and Controversy
    The Trinitarian Theology of John Gill (1697-1771): Context, Sources, and Controversy Godet, Steven ABSTRACT THE TRINITARIAN THEOLOGY OF JOHN GILL (1697–1771): CONTEXT, SOURCES, AND CONTROVERSY Steven Tshombe Godet, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Chair: Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin In the eighteenth century in Britain, a major controversy arose over the doctrine of the Trinity. This controversy embroiled both the Established Church and Dissenters. One of the champions among the Dissenters was John Gill, a Particular Baptist minister. This dissertation will examine how Gill defended the doctrine of the Trinity against various unorthodox views. Chapter 1 introduces the thesis, history of research, and methodology. Chapter 2 examines the political, cultural, and theological context of John Gill and then surveys his life and works. Chapter 3 examines the trinitarian crisis in two phases: phase 1 (1688–1711) and phase 2 (1712–29). Chapter 4 surveys Gill as a Patristic scholar and analyzes his use of Patristic sources in the debate over the Trinity. Chapter 5–8 introduces Gill’s doctrine of Trinity. Chapter 5 defines Gill’s key trinitarian terms while also considering the importance, revelation, and mystery of the Trinity. Chapter 6 seeks to understand Gill’s defense of the unity of God and plurality of the Godhead. Chapters 7 and 8 examine the distinction of the three persons in the Godhead and the distinct personality and deity of the three persons who are one God. Chapter 9 considers how Gill applied the doctrine of the Trinity to several areas of the Christian life. Chapter 10 summarizes the main arguments and suggests some areas of future study in Gill.
  • A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE CHURCH RETENTION RATE OF CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
    A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE CHURCH RETENTION RATE OF CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES Kaiser, Travis The purpose of this study was to examine the claim that 70 to 90% of youth ministry participants abandon the church after high school graduation. Chapter 1 examines the current statistics related to the church retention of young adults. The research questions used to guide the study are introduced. In order to accomplish the goal of the study, Shields' Youth Ministry Retention Questionnaire (YMRQ) was used to compare the youth ministry commitment of Christian high school graduates with their current levels of church involvement. Chapter 2 reviews the critical literature to this study. The issues of the role of church and the calling for Christians to be together, understanding who is defined as a young adult, and Protestant schooling in America are explored. Chapter 3 describes the process by which the data for this study was gathered. Graduates from the four types of Christian high schools (covenantal independent, covenantal church-related, open-admission independent, and open-admission church-related) were invited to participate in the YMRQ survey. All of the respondents were graduates of ACSI member schools. Chapter 4 reports the analysis of the data from the completed surveys. The data was analyzed using Chi-Square tests and ANOVA tests to determine the statistical significance between the two variables. For all levels of youth ministry commitment, these young adults maintained a low to high level of involvement with a church after graduating high school. Bridging the language of statistics and the language of the practice of youth ministry, a clearer retention rate of Christian school graduates is 82.9%. This percentage represents those students in the moderate and high levels of church engagement as young adults. The final chapter presents the conclusions based on the findings of this study. Any variances in the data and the reasons for their existence are also explored. Based on the results of the research, applications are made for Christian schooling and local church youth ministry.
  • Implications of Theological Anthropology for Online Pedagogy in Graduate-Level Ministerial Training
    Implications of Theological Anthropology for Online Pedagogy in Graduate-Level Ministerial Training Etzel, Gabriel Benjamin The thesis of this dissertation is that by utilizing a biblical-theological framework, best practices of online graduate-level ministerial training can be presented in such a way that the role of the faculty, the objectives of the classroom, and the purpose of the institution are focused more effectively on the formation of students as ministers of the gospel. It is argued the role of the faculty member should be a model for students to follow, which necessitates institutions prioritize theological competencies ahead of technological and pedagogical competencies when hiring faculty, and institutions prioritize the faculty member's ongoing spiritual formation in the development and evaluation of theological, pedagogical, and technological competencies. In addition, it is argued the objectives of the classroom should be formation-centered, which necessitates the faculty member should utilize social presence within online courses that prioritizes the formation of students over the learning of students, and the faculty member should create community with and among students, beyond social presence, that prioritizes the formation of students over the learning of students. Finally, it is argued the purpose of the institution should focus on the ministerial effectiveness of the student, which necessitates online graduate-level ministerial training should extend beyond the online classroom by utilizing the student's local church context for the spiritual formation and ministerial preparation of the student, and online graduate-level ministerial training should elevate the formation of the student as a minister of the gospel within the local church over the retention of the student or the knowledge gained by the student. Chapter 1 introduces the resource, Best Practices of Online Education: A Guide for Christian Higher Education, as one of the only resources seeking to present a comprehensive approach to the integration of theology, pedagogy, and technology. Chapter 2 considers how theological anthropology affects pedagogy and concludes with a presentation of David Powlison's Comprehensive Internal model as a biblical-theological framework. Chapters 3 through 5 focus on Powlison's epistemological priorities--articulating biblical truth; critiquing, debunking, and reinterpreting alternative models; and, learning from defective models as it applies to online graduate-level ministerial training.
  • Do Good to All People as You Have the Opportunity: A Biblical Theology of the Good Deeds Mission of the New Covenant Community
    Do Good to All People as You Have the Opportunity: A Biblical Theology of the Good Deeds Mission of the New Covenant Community Wind, John This dissertation provides a biblical theology of the good deeds mission of the New Covenant community, with a particular focus on how one’s conception of the overall covenantal structure of Scripture affects one’s conclusions concerning the good deeds mission. Chapter 1 introduces the debate over the good deeds mission of the church, whether good deeds out to the world have equal priority with evangelism or whether evangelism retains operational priority. Chapter 2 provides an in-depth review of the relevant literature since 1974, covering the (overlapping) categories of missiology and biblical theology. The review is divided into literature supporting either the equal priority or the evangelistic priority position, highlighting the different biblical-theological arguments offered. Chapter 3 surveys the good deeds responsibility given to all humanity, including the initial responsibilities of Genesis 1-2, the impact of sin upon this mission as displayed in Genesis 3-7, and the partial renewal of humanity’s good deeds mandate in Genesis 8-11. Chapter 4 explores the good deeds mission given to Abraham and his descendants until the time of Christ, distinguishing the good deeds mission of Abraham and his descendants until possession of the covenant land, the good deeds mission of Abraham’s descendants from possession of the covenant land until the exile, and the good deeds mission of Abraham’s descendants from the exile until Christ. Chapter 5 studies the good deeds mission of God’s covenant people in the Gospels before New Covenant inauguration, divided into two categories: the earthly ministry of Jesus Christ and the pre-New Covenant ministry of his disciples, giving careful attention to the unique transitional period of Christ’s earthly ministry. Chapter 6 analyzes the good deeds mission in the New Covenant in three distinct categories: the inaugurated New Covenant ministry of Christ, the inaugurated New Covenant ministry of disciples, and the consummated New Covenant ministry of Christ and his disciples. Chapter 7 summarizes the biblical-theological conclusions which emerge from the research of the dissertation, recapping the main elements of a biblical theology of the good deeds mission of the New Covenant community and providing practical applications.
  • Far and Near: Christian Worship of the Transcendent and Immanent God of Wonders
    Far and Near: Christian Worship of the Transcendent and Immanent God of Wonders Lewis, Jr., Charles Thomas ABSTRACT FAR AND NEAR: CHRISTIAN WORSHIP OF THE TRANSCENDENT AND IMMANENT GOD OF WONDERS Charles Thomas Lewis, Jr., Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Chair: Dr. Bruce A. Ware "Far and Near: Christian Worship of the Transcendent and Immanent God of Wonders" examines the rhythm of transcendence then immanence represented in divine worship encounters and significant prayers recorded in Scripture. With the objective of determining how transcendence and immanence shapes modern worship services in Southern Baptist churches, this dissertation also documents the goals, values, and objectives that may influence how worship pastors in Southern Baptist churches select and sequence elements to be included in their corporate worship services. Chapter 1 establishes the propensity of the modern church to bypass the transcendence of God while rushing to embrace God's immanence. Chapter 2 discusses the age of immanence and individualism--two modern mindsets permeating religious thinking and corporate worship of many Christians in modern times. This chapter also discusses the residual effects of the loss of focus on God's transcendence--the centralization of man coupled with the displacement of God from his rightful place of centrality in worship. Using the findings of the Worship Design Project 2014, chapter 3 is an empirical documentation of worship praxis and design by worship pastors in the most attended Southern Baptist churches in the United States. Chapter 4 discusses the biblical historical grounding of transcendence including God's transcendent holiness, aseity, sovereignty, constancy, omnipotence, omniscience, omnipresence, and timeless eternality. Chapter 5 considers how God's immanent attributes are rooted in and flow from his transcendent characteristics. Chapter 6 is a Christological reflection on how Jesus Christ--God immanently with us--remains transcendent in relationship to his creation and his church. Chapter 7, the central focus of this dissertation, uses biblical data to demonstrate the rhythm of transcendence then immanence represented in divine worship encounters and prayer. Chapter 8 addresses the implications of properly balanced and ordered transcendence and immanence for modern worship service planning and design in the free church tradition. The thesis advanced in this dissertation is that, in divine-human encounters, the Bible demonstrates a repeated pattern of conceptualizing and understanding God in his transcendent otherness both prior to his immanence and as the framework within which his immanence can only be rightly understood and experienced.
  • John Piper: The Making of a Christian Hedonist
    John Piper: The Making of a Christian Hedonist Taylor, Justin Gerald JOHN PIPER: THE MAKING OF A CHRISTIAN HEDONIST Justin Gerald Taylor, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Chair: Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin This dissertation on noted pastor and author John Piper (1946- ) constitutes an early effort in the field of intellectual biography, tracing four key influences--in roughly chronological order--upon Piper's life and theology. Those with primary influence in Piper's formative years were his parents, William S. H. Piper (1919-2007) and Ruth Mohn Piper (1918-1974), who exhibited a unique combination of joyful fundamentalism. Piper's next major influence was C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), discovered during his undergraduate studies at Wheaton College, who introduced him to romantic rationalism. Piper's first teacher at Fuller Seminary was Daniel P. Fuller (1925- ), a hermeneutics professor who planted the seeds of Christian hedonism and who gave him a love for exegetical biblicism. It was during these seminary days and into his time of doctoral study that Piper discovered Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), whose affectional Calvinism would go on to shape Piper's theology more than anyone else. Piper's three primary venues of ministerial vocation--teaching, preaching, and writing--are all examined to reveal the ways in which each of these influencers played various roles in Piper's development of Christian hedonism and his distinct contribution to a theology of the Christian life. The dissertation concludes with two applications of the foregoing analysis, exploring how Piper uses Scripture and how he appropriates church history for pastoral ends. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography of Piper's published works (1971-2015).
  • Working for the Glory of God: The Distinction Between Greed and Self-Interest in the Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul
    Working for the Glory of God: The Distinction Between Greed and Self-Interest in the Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul Kotter, David Scott This dissertation demonstrates that the Pauline corpus is sufficient to discern a distinction between self-interest and greed. The review of literature in chapter 1 reveals that definitions of greed often rely on such terms as “excessive” and “inordinate,” without defining the terms. Chapter 2 shows Paul’s expectation that believers work usefully in the church, home, and marketplace. Paul exhorted believers to work profitably to bring glory to God, serve others in love, and be self-supporting. Serving others is aided in the marketplace by the information conveyed by prices and profits. This chapter defines “sanctified self-interest” and highlights Paul’s encouragement to generosity. Chapter 3 employs interdisciplinary tools from accounting (income statement and balance sheet) to show greed is manifested as an insatiable desire for more and an unwillingness to give away possessions. The Pauline income statement indicates that greed causes sin at work, such as fraud or neglect. The love of money makes profit the ultimate goal rather than subduing creation and serving others. The Pauline balance sheet represents reasons for holding assets: sustenance, utility, security, and enjoyment. Beyond these assets, maintaining possessions devolves into greedy indulgence and signaling riches. Chapter 4 extends the distinction into standardized categories across cultures and through time by valuing goods in terms of the unchanging standard of hours of human life. Chapter 5 compares the Pauline categories to representative Second Temple Jewish literature to show that Paul’s views of avarice and economics were consistent with, but not identical to, this literature Chapter 6 compares the Pauline categories to representative Greco-Roman philosophical schools to show the fundamental differences with Epicurus, Seneca, and Aristotle. Even when all four superficially agree, the supporting rationale diverges radically. An important conclusion is that the methodology utilized in this dissertation imposes neither modern economic categories nor Pauline categories into every historical text. Chapter 7 summarizes the argument and underscores that the changes facing the church over the next two centuries will be even more rapid than the economic developments of the two centuries since the Industrial Revolution.
  • Erasmus as Interpreter of the Sermon on the Mount in his Paraphrase on Matthew
    Erasmus as Interpreter of the Sermon on the Mount in his Paraphrase on Matthew Vasut, Ryan This thesis examines Erasmus’s interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount in his Paraphrase on Matthew. The argument is that Erasmus offers a particularly rich reading of the Sermon through his use of the church fathers, his intratextual interpretive habits, and his exegetical insights. Chapter 1 briefly surveys major contributions for the study of the Paraphrases and provides a general introduction to the Paraphrases. Chapter 2 examines Erasmus’s frequent use of the church fathers throughout the Sermon and suggests that he shapes their works to meet his rhetorical needs. Chapter 3 surveys the intratextual connections Erasmus makes within the Sermon itself and between the Sermon and the rest of Matthew. Chapter 4 presents a couple passage-level insights from Erasmus and a discussion of his tripartite structure through the center of the Sermon as reflections from exegetical history. Chapter 5 concludes with a summary of the argument.
  • The Impact of Gospel Content on the Shape of Corporate Worship in Select Baptist Churches in North America circa 1650-1910
    The Impact of Gospel Content on the Shape of Corporate Worship in Select Baptist Churches in North America circa 1650-1910 Connell, Richard Scott Recent trends in Baptist worship have revealed an interest in Liturgical forms and some movement toward more thoughtful worship content and order in what has historically been a free church worship tradition. The fields of liturgical theology and liturgical anthropology have produced research that indicates that there is validity to this interest and that the order of worship elements can be instructive as is the content of worship. When both are oriented around the gospel's shape and truth (e.g., the gospel of the glory of Christ), the worshiper is pointed to Christ who is the object of faith and the facilitator of spiritual formation through the Holy Spirit. The result is a worshiper who becomes like the one he holds in view in worship. This survey of representative churches in North American Baptist history (ca. 1650-1910) reveals that there has always been some evidence regarding the gospel's presence in Baptist worship. This has not always been due to deliberate thought and planning, but because the gospel controls its forms. Where a church has held the gospel, its worship has reflected that conviction. Where the gospel has been lost, worship is at least reflective of that, if not partially the precipitator. These churches reflect varying degrees of gospel-content and form. The historical trend demonstrates that overall, Baptists have held the gospel, often in the face of stiff opposition. This grip on grace has been reflected consistently in their worship and likely is at least one of the reasons that they have continued to grow. Their growth is at least partially, in direct correlation to their worshiping in light of the cross. They have not just sung of the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus, but they have engaged it in corporate worship and reflected the effects of this encounter with Christlikeness in their daily lives of worship.
  • "The Most Versatile Man": The Life, Ministry, and Piety of Basil Manly Jr.
    "The Most Versatile Man": The Life, Ministry, and Piety of Basil Manly Jr. Smallwood, William This dissertation argues that the life and ministry of Basil Manly Jr. had remarkable impact on the spiritual lives of Southern Baptists. His ability to transform people through the diversity of his labors, which he personally felt were too broad, continues to exert meaningful sway upon his denomination, and more broadly, American evangelicalism. Manly must be remembered as a central figure in the establishment, shaping, and preservation of many of the enduring institutions of the Southern Baptist Convention—Sunday school, hymnody, and theological education—all while not compromising historic, orthodox beliefs of the church. By reviewing his primary sources, this dissertation develops a cohesive understanding of the themes and practice of piety demonstrated in the life and thought of Manly. The introduction explains the importance of Manly’s life, ministry, and piety in light of his influence within the Southern Baptist Convention. Chapter 2 analyzes the impact of the teaching and preaching of his father and the spiritual tradition that became known as the Charleston tradition with its emphasis on Calvinistic theology, orderly worship, and, most significantly in Manly’s life, an educated and professional clergy. Chapter 3 studies the influences upon Manly in the development of his piety during his theological education at two Northern institutions. Chapter 4 discusses the role of Manly played in the establishment of a Sunday school in every Baptist church for the conversion and spiritual growth of all but especially children and young people. Chapter 5 explores Manly’s work as not only a hymn writer but also an editor and compiler of hymns. The hymns written, tunes composed, and the hymnals edited by Manly are marks of a rich spirituality of worship. Chapter 6 examines Manly’s view of Scripture, chiefly his understanding of the doctrine of inspiration. Chapter 7, the conclusion, discusses the long-term impact of Manly not only on the Southern Baptist Convention but several Southern Baptist institutions. Manly’s piety, grounded firmly in and fashioned by Scripture, was instrumental in shaping the piety of future generations of Southern Baptists.
  • The Illeism of Jesus and Yahweh: A Study of the Use of the Third-Person Self-Reference in the Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Its Implications for Christology
    The Illeism of Jesus and Yahweh: A Study of the Use of the Third-Person Self-Reference in the Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Its Implications for Christology Elledge, Ervin Roderick This study explores the relationship between the use of the third person for self-reference by Jesus and Yahweh and suggests the potential for both divine and royal themes associated with this manner of speech. Chapter 1 highlights that this issue has received little attention in scholarship. In order to offer a thorough evaluation, the study offers a comprehensive survey of illeim in the Bible, highlighting its prominence and various rhetorical implications. Chapter 2 surveys the use of illeism in antiquity in order to address whether illeism was a common manner of speaking. Though various Greek historians refer to themselves in the third person, evidence indicates that this was a rhetorical effort sometimes used to give a sense of objectivity to their works. No evidence was found that would indicate that illeism was commonly used in direct speech. Chapter 3 surveys the Old Testament and categorizes the various uses of illeism. The study highlights the similar and prominent use by both OT kings and Yahweh. Chapter 4 explores the ANE literature for occurrences of illeism and notes the relatively prominent use among both ANE kings and preeminent pagan gods. Chapter 5 addresses the illeism of Jesus, the only person in the New Testament to use illeism in direct discourse, and finds a similar manner of use and rhetorical intention as that of Old Testament and ANE kings and that of Yahweh. In each case the illeism serves to emphasize the speaker's unique identity and authority associated with royal and/or divine status. The study also notes the illeism of Yahweh and Jesus share the common characteristics of prominence of occurrences, a shifting between first and third person, a variety of distinct self-references, and similar rhetorical intent. Chapter 6 summarizes the study and highlights the suggestive nature of the evidence. In light of the evaluation of the use of illeism by Jesus and Yahweh, based on the similar usage among Old Testament and ANE kings, and ANE gods, as well as the analysis of the various rhetorical implications of illeism, the evidence suggests that a royal and divine theme may be associated with the third-person self-references of Yahweh and Jesus. Furthermore, in light of the parallels between the two uses, the study suggests this manner of speech may be yet another way Jesus presents himself "as God."
  • Leadership Style and Tenure of Youth Ministers: A Mixed Methods Study
    Leadership Style and Tenure of Youth Ministers: A Mixed Methods Study Steen, John Ellis ABSTRACT LEADERSHIP STYLE AND TENURE OF YOUTH MINISTERS: A MIXED METHODS STUDY John Ellis Steen, Ph.D. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2015 Chair: Dr. Brian C. Richardson This research study is an examination of the relationship between leadership styles and the longevity of youth ministers. Leadership styles are measured according to the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Interviews with veteran youth ministers provide in-depth personal advice and guidance into an extended career as a youth minister. The literature review includes a biblical and theological foundation for Christian leadership, an overview of leadership studies, and an examination of the importance of youth ministry. The research endeavors to prove a connection between leadership styles and youth ministers with extended careers. Key Words: Youth, Youth Ministry, Youth Minister, Student Ministry, Student Minister, Leadership, Leadership Styles, Longevity, Christian Leadership, Church Leadership, Teenager, Tenure, Extended Tenure, Youth Pastor